Throwback to the 80’s

Today it being a snow day and not having to go to class, all I want to do is watch movies. One thing you should now about me is that I love movies, especially ones from 80’s. I think Sometimes I was born in the wrong decade, the style, music, and movies were awesome. Without a question the best 80’s movies about high school is The Breakfast Club. Teen high school movies are all about being a kid and finding yourself. Despite the fact that this type of movies are wonderful they do not portray education in a very negative light.  Why does it matter if media paints educationally negatively? People believe what media tells them, they trust it despite the fact they are often exaggerated. They make it seem like teachers do not care about students, and that student hate being at school. Despite the fact that the movies are embellished they take nuggets of truth. This movie does take real issues in schools, because of this movie can show a lot about flaws in the system. For these reasons let’s breakdown this movie.

The Breakfast Club

If you Breakfast clubhave not seen this movie you absolutely have to it is a true classic. A group of completely different high school kids come together in detention. These kids would have never become friends on their own but their experience brings them together. Their assignment is to write an essay about who they are. This is a high school ideal understanding and befriending people from different cliques. The teacher Mr. Veron was a bully and hardnosed. One of his most famous lines from the movies is “next time I have to come in here I am cracking skulls.” It is clear that John Bender, the rebel of the group, is disrespectful and clearly has major issues with authority. The teacher however does not handle this properly. Threats and letting his temper go are not the answer to disciplinary issue. There has to be a better way to deal with classroom management.

An even more important issue with Mr. Veron is that he gives up on his students and thinks they have no futures. Detention is a sign of failure to this teacher instead of being just a mistake. The idea of second chances is not one Mr. Veron really has. These are just kids, they are supposed to make mistakes. The important thing is that once students make mistakes they have positive influences to guide them on the right path. Mr. Veron does not consider the extra circumstances of why these kids were in detention. There is so much going on in the lives of high school students. They are figuring out who they are, facing peer pressure, and can have challenging home lives. All of these things need to be considered when students misbehave. These circumstances also connect to the misunderstanding that kids that misbehave hate school. Most likely it is not school that they hate there are probably other things going that are impacting their experience. As teachers it is important to do make environments that help students love school, and be the type of people who can support their students. Overall The Breakfast Club is a classic film that can also teach message about education.

treat yourself to the perfect movie ending:

Beth Gaudette

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2 Responses to Throwback to the 80’s

  1. marrisarose says:

    I thought this article was really fun. I never thought about learning about education through pop culture films. Also, kudos to the ending, it truly is the best movie ending of all times.

    Like

  2. devin17h says:

    I loved the way that you approached this topic! I also think that your post really addresses how school culture and teacher-student relations can affect the learning environment and future behaviors.

    Like

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