Monthly Archives: February 2016

Increasing the scope of inclusivity

The Politics of Reading class has spent much of the past month discussing standardized tests and their impacts, looking at the way that standardized testing can unfairly and disproportionate exclude and hurt low-income, minority students. Certainly, credence and attention must … Continue reading

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Lexile Scores: the Mismeasurement of Reading

Recently my 14-year-old asked me, “What is the highest Lexile score you’ve ever heard of?” I am not a fan of kids (or adults, for that matter) comparing themselves on the basis of test scores or numbers, so I deliberately … Continue reading

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NCLB and why it couldn’t possibly work

No Child Left Behind was an educational reform policy developed and implemented in 2001 by George W. Bush. This program supported standards-based education reform with the goal of improving education for the nation as a whole. However, this policy was … Continue reading

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The perverse incentives of”teaching to the test”

When I was around ten years old, the ITBS took over. And then it was the CRCT and the EOCT. I don’t remember much about it, as blissfully unaware of its larger context and certain to pass as I was. … Continue reading

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Challenging Authority in Schools

Recently, there’s been conversation about books recommended by Common Core. For the post of the week, we looked at a recent post about the Common Core booklist and what that means for students. Essentially, it looked at how a recommended … Continue reading

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Line Item

  Policy dictates what occurs in education; now more than ever. Schools are cutting programming that is essential to children developing a well-rounded education. Music, art, and PE are on the chopping block. When the rigors of test taking demand … Continue reading

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Two-Part Teacher Pay Plan

The Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools district in North Carolina is delaying Project ADVANCE, its plan to adopt a new model of teacher pay that rewards “professional development” rather than longevity. ¬†The Chapel Hill News reported¬†on February 8th that the district … Continue reading

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